Rocky Mountain has significantly upgraded its Slayer platform, bringing it back to its freeride roots.

Less enduro, more hucks and more good times. With the miracles of modern mountain bike technology, the 2020 Slayer is still a bike you can pedal to the top of your local double-black trail, which we put to the test recently in Whistler. Still, with coil suspension instead of air, and 170 mm of travel (with the option to go up to 200 mm up front), the Slayer’s intentions are clear. Rocky’s latest wants to go fast and hit big jumps.

Rocky Mountain Slayer
Thomas Vanderham and the 2020 Slayer approaching full send. Photo: Margus Riga

Carson Storch, Thomas Vanderham and Remi Gauvin are all willing, and extremely capable of showing off the 2020 Slayer’s chops. In Oscillation, the three riders hit up three very different riding areas to show of the freeride bikes capabilities.

Rocky Mountain Slayer
Remi Gauvin pushes the Slayer in Squamish. Photo: Margus Riga

In Rocky Mountain’s words:

“Back and forth, forward and back. Mastery on the bike comes from constant repetition. Whether it’s your hundredth time down a trail or you’re about to drop into a new one for the first time, steady, well-rehearsed motions are what will get you through. So, ride fast and send it deep because the Slayer is built for those who charge.”

Watch Vanderham, Gauvin and Storch ride the Rocky Mountain Slayer in Oscillation below:

Director/ Edit: Liam Mullany
Featuring: Thomas Vanderham, Rémi Gauvin, Carson Storch
Cinematography: Harrison Mendel, Liam Mullany
Produced by: Liam Mullany, Stephen Matthews

Rocky Mountain Slayer
Rocky Mountain Slayer. Photo: Margus Riga

Assistant camera: Noah Dorsey, Max McCullough
Colourist: Sam Gilling
Post-production Sound: Keith White Audio
Still photography: Margus Riga

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