Cam Wurf runs half-marathon after racing Great Ocean Road Race

The INEOS rider continues his triathlon antics during the World Tour

February 5th, 2020 by | Posted in News | Tags: , , , , ,

Australia’s Cam Wurf was an Olympic rower before he turned to professional bike racing. He joined Cannondale Pro Cycling in 2013, but by 2015 he felt he hadn’t found his niche in the cycling and began competing in triathlon.

Wurf broke the Kona bike course record multiple times, went on to run a very fast 2 hour 50 min Ironman marathon and most recently finished top-five at the Ironman World Championship.

Team Ineos members Cam Wurf and Ian Stannard push the pace at the front of the peloton at the Cadel Evans Great Ocean Road Race. Photo: www.teamineos.com
Team Ineos members Cam Wurf and Ian Stannard push the pace at the front of the peloton at the Cadel Evans Great Ocean Road Race. Photo: www.teamineos.com

Last week, team INEOS was left without a member when rider Vasil Kiryienka was forced to retire due to a heart condition. Wurf, still training for his triathlon season which begins in May, stepped up to the plate and took Kiryienka’s spot.

Although he DNFed, he completed the majority of the race

His first race on the team was at the Cadel Evans Great Ocean Road Race, where he helped his teammate Pavel Sivakov take second place.  Wurf was evidently not satisfied with his 367 watt average, 4,852 kJ World Tour level race. The super-athlete finished his ride and ran an entire half-marathon.

“I’ll run back to the hotel now,” he said. “They’ve perfectly positioned the finish line a half marathon distance away, which is (coach) Tim Kerrison’s minimum requirement.”

A packed season

Lionel Sanders
Cameron Wurf passes Lionel Sanders in the bike leg at the 2017 Ironman world championships. Photo: Tom Pennington/Getty Images for Ironman

Wurf plans on continuing his triathlon training throughout the road season.

“Basically my training won’t change at all,” he said. “I’ll let the racing provide a bit of stimulus boost to my cycling.”

“I might cut back on the running intensity leading into a road race, but certainly not the volume,” he continued. “Swimming will remain the focus, and I’ll continue to increase the load there as planned.”

It remains to be seen how he will work in this training load, the World Tour and three to four triathlons and Ironman competitions.

“Race wise, I’ll do the Collins cup in late May, then Roth and perhaps something before Kona – Canada or a half. That’s a bit up in the air.”