Mountain bike skills for curly-bar riders

October 22nd, 2019 by Canadian Cycling Magazine | Posted in Cyclocross, MTB, Training | No Comments »

Improve handling on CX courses or gravel roads with some singletrack wisdom


Mad skills on display at the U.S. national cyclocross championships

January 15th, 2018 by Philippe Tremblay | Posted in News, Video | No Comments »

Christopher Blevins and Cody Kaiser show off some sweet bike handling


Essential group ride etiquette to not be ‘that rider’

May 13th, 2017 by Philippe Tremblay | Posted in Spotlight, Training | No Comments »

8 of the unspoken rules and etiquette of the group ride


How to mount your bike for cyclocross

September 26th, 2014 by Peter Glassford | Posted in News, Skills, Technique, Video | No Comments »

Many new ’cross racers fear landing on their groins during the traditional cyclocross mount. This fear and lack of practice result in slow, inefficient and dangerous movements during races. To improve your mount, start by standing beside your bike, with your left hand on the handlebar and your right hand on top tube.


How to shoulder your bike for cyclocross

September 25th, 2014 by Peter Glassford | Posted in News, Skills, Technique, Video | No Comments »

Shouldering the bike is not as common as dismounting, mounting or cornering, but is still a great skill to have. You should shoulder the bike when the ground becomes inefficient for pushing the bike or when you have to carry for a long time (for example, up a stair run-up). Your bike can’t have bottle cages if you are going to throw it on your shoulder.


How to dismount your bike for cyclocross

September 24th, 2014 by Peter Glassford | Posted in News, Skills, Technique, Video | No Comments »

Dismounting is important in cyclocross because almost every race has barriers or run-ups that will force you off the bike. To set up a great dismount, stand with your weight on your left foot and the left pedal at 6 o’clock in the stroke. Unclip your right foot, swing it around the back of the saddle and rest it behind your left foot and pedal as you coast toward the obstacle.