As cyclists patiently await the start of cycling season, here are eight movies you can sit back and enjoy today to get your fix. Or better yet, hop on the trainer, plug in some headphones and press play to enjoy some two wheeled entertainment while building base for the summer kilometres ahead.

Inspired to Ride (2015)

Inspired to Ride follows a group of cyclists as they take on the inaugural edition of the Trans Am Bike Race. On June 7, 2014. forty-five cyclists from around the world set out unsupported to cross the continent covering 6812 kilometres with no crew, follow cars, or prize money at the end. The route follows the trans America hiking trail passing through 10 states with varied and beautiful landscape of the Rockies, the Great Plains and the Appalachians. The athletes set out to cover 480 km daily testing their fitness, their gear and their mental strength.

Stop at Nothing (2014)

This documentary explores the career and personality of Lance Armstrong following the findings of the USADA investigation which voided his seven Tour de France victories and found him to be a career drug cheat. Cyclists may be familiar with the plot but director Alex Holmes tells the story behind the cheating and bullying speaking to Armstrong’s former friends and teammates. It’s a scandal that dominated the news headlines smearing the image of the sport all the while capturing peoples attention.

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Pantani: The Accidental Death of a Cyclist (2014)

Images of Marco Pantani crushing his rival on alpine climbs are iconic in cycling. He was a flamboyant and one of the most popular cyclists of his generation. His 1998 Giro-Tour double remains the last time the feat was accomplished. The Italian’s career and untimely death are told in this documentary. The portrait is positive focusing on his achievements and battle with addiction instead of the accusations of doping that plagued him.

Line of Sight (2012)

Lucas Brunelle has been racing for a decade in the underground bike messenger scene and brings footage from the fast action from a first-person perspective. The bike handling-skills required to navigate the hectic city streets of cities around the world is shown in the 60-minute film of Brunelle’s best footage. It takes viewers onto expressways in Mexico City, over the frozen Charles River in Boston, under the Mediterranean Sea, across the Great Wall of China and into the jungles of Guatemala.

Bicycling with Molière (2013)

This French comedy-drama was the winner of the Best in World Cinema award at the 2014 Sarasota Film Festival. It’s a movie about a pair of actors who are friends at odds with one another. One of the men has moved to île de Ré, off France’s Atlantic coast to escape the stage. The other arrives urging him to return to Paris to appear opposite him in a play. The friends argue and rehearse scenes while cycling.

Ride to Glory (2013)

A French movie that tells the story of Francois Nouel, a former racer who works for a company that sponsors a team in the Tour de France. It’s an entertaining feel good movie with the protagonist being called to the biggest race in the world to drive the team car the day before he is set to leave on vacation with his family. Things immediately start to go wrong. It’s a movie about the protagonists ups and downs, chasing dreams, self sacrifice, and the importance of family.

Premium Rush (2012)

A New York City bicycle messenger played by Joseph Gordon-Levitt picks up an envelope at Columbia University which attracts the attention of a dirty cop. This action-thriller follows the messenger as he is chased across Manhattan by the police officer who wants whatever is inside of it.

Breaking Away (1979)

This coming of age comedy-drama takes place in Bloomington, Indiana and tells the story of a small-town teenager and his friends. Dave is nineteen and becomes obsessed with an Italian cycling team so much so that he even picks up Italian culture. The friends clash with college students while they try and figure out what they want to do with their lives.


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